Brian Hatch: Mini watercolours, modern scrimshaw and prints - Art Collector

Brian Hatch, Wilpena Pound 2016, watercolour on paper. Courtesy of the artist. Courtesy of the artist and Redland Art Gallery

Mini watercolours, modern scrimshaw and prints showcase a series of miniature watercolours and imaginative landscapes and seascapes inspired by Brian’s travels around Australia. A creative approach using a wet-inwet technique where colours and shapes merge and the use of rags as brushes maintains a broad treatment. The scrimshaw-style zinc plates series followed from a visit to Hawaii where engraved whale bones and teeth were on display at a gallery in Maui. The revelation of a link between printmaking and scrimshaw, where ink or lampblack is forced into the engraved lines and the surface is wiped clean, became the inspiration for this series of scrimshaw plates and prints.

Exhibition opens: 10am, Saturday 20 August 2016
Exhibition closes: 3 September 2016
Location: Redland Art Gallery, Capalaba, Capalaba Place, Noeleen Street, Capalaba Q 4157
Contact: 07 3829 8484
Website: http://artgallery.redland.qld.gov.au

About Redland Art Gallery
Redland Art Gallery was officially opened in 2003 and is dedicated to the memory of Eddie Santaguiliana, a former Mayor of the Shire. The gallery is located in Redland City, east of Brisbane, an area that covers 537 square kilometres consisting of mainland and islands. Redland Art Gallery serves a population of 131,000 in a region of bayside suburbs, hinterland areas and islands scattered throughout Moreton Bay.

Redland Art Gallery’s exhibitions and events feature local, Queensland, nationally and internationally recognised artists.

The exhibition program is showcased in six exhibition spaces over two locations at Cleveland and Capalaba. Gallery programs extend to island and mainland locations. The gallery’s policy is to support and encourage access, diversity and opportunity; to create a deeper sense of identity and place; and to acknowledge the region’s significant Indigenous culture and heritage.

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